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Thursday, September 15, 2016

An Artist, Even to the End

Lucille Webster, Holling’s wife, was a striking woman of many talents, chiefly an artist in her own right and a collaborator to Holling’s writing, research and illustration.  Born on Dec. 8, 1900, in Valparaiso, Ind., her initial interest lay in art fashion and she attended the Art Institute of Chicago.  In Chicago, she designed theatrical scenery and costumes, and she drew for fashion publications.   

A woman of many talents, she flew a Piper Cub and coined the term “hero” for a hoagie or sub sandwich because “you had to be a hero to eat it all.” 

No less a personage than food critic Clementine Paddleford in This Week magazine asked  Lucille about Pagoo when she was a dinner guest of the Hollings at their home in Pasadena, Cal.  “Holling did the writing,” Lucille said, “and the 20 full-page color plates.  I did the black and white detailed marginal drawings.”  That day, Lucille prepared the dinner of chicken Hawaiian to celebrate publication of Pagoo, the hermit crab, their fifth book in the children’s series. 

When Holling died on Sept. 7, 1973, Lucille did not come to Michigan for the funeral, possibly because she was not well at the time.  But she wrote out these detailed instructions for the monument and left handwritten instructions for type sizes, fonts and measurements. 
 
 
 
In researching this, Joan Hoffman of the Holling collection in Henrietta Township, Mich., said, “[Lucille’s] pattern was printed on cardstock weight paper.  It has been rolled up for years, probably since the early 70s.”  She carefully unrolled it to take the photo seen here.
 
 
 
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She says, “I assume she purposely did not include Holling’s birth and death dates to send the message that he lives as long as his books are read.”  The silhouette is, of course, Paddle-to-the-Sea, Holling’s most popular and representative icon.  That marker is at the Nims Cemetery near our home in Henrietta Township.